Friday, January 27, 2006

From an xpn bulletin board post I just left...
Still makes some good points even without the contextual thread...
And we haven't exactly been here a whole lot lately...



Well...at 12/13 I was spending a minimum of 5 hours a day in the pottery studio at my Jr. High school. It has always been my passion and I feel like I've lost a part of myself in the past 10 years as I've moved away from doing anything art-related. Home ownership moved me into computer programming and teaching before I ended up doing home repair/renovation. The current career is the least frustrating probably because I get to work with my hands and the end result is right there for all to see...but it's still not Art.

Like I say in my bio...Jack of All Trades...Master of One. And the one is pottery. I'm good at a lot of things...but I'm a GREAT potter.

What I want to do is open an Art Gallery where I can just make stuff all the time and sell it in my little shop. Pottery, paintings, sculpture...all things Art. I've recently begun to look at all the things I've done in the past ten years as my way of working towards that and not away from it...If I play my cards right, the house my computer programming and teaching jobs bought me should be able to get me that little shop on a big property somewhere out in the middle of Pennsylvania (or wherever) where I can get back to doing what I'm meant to do.
When I was younger and still doing Art and my dad was still alive I kept trying to talk him into being like Rousseau...a postal clerk who became a MAJOR artist beginning in his mid 60's. Little did I know it was going to be me who would have to try to resurrect an Art career (life) when I got older.

As for Ann's workshop thingey...in my life I've done a lot of those adventurous things...joined the Army and saw some of the world...bought a Harley and rode it across the country, etc. I will say this...I do not regret anything I have done in my life...the only regrets I have are centered around the things I haven't done. And the way I figure it...as long as you're still breathing it's never too late to do what you really want to do.

Most of the obstacles we face when thinking about living our dream lives are put there by other people telling us what a hard row to hoe our chosen dream is. The thing age has taught me is that those people have no idea what they are talking about. I could spend an hour typing stories about my folks telling me to get a teaching degree, "So I'd have something to fall back on" rather than switching majors and actually getting a BFA...or about my nephew the musical phenom who played his first gig at a bar behind a drum kit at 4 years old and now at 8 has blown through his piano lessons and has moved on to learning to play guitar and hopefully he will never hear my mother say how hard a career music is like she said to me when we were recently talking about him. I think that's the hardest part of living your dream...sticking to it when people try to squash it. I now know people who chose their life and stuck to it and they are the ones living their dream life. And I watched them...it wasn't hard per-se...they just were the ones that stuck with it where others get frustrated and move on. I recently saw that one of my best friends from college managed to make it on the dream job thing....of the 38 Art Ed students I was with he's the only one I know that is now teaching Art where he went to high school. We all went into it because we had a Great Art teacher somewhere along the line and dreamed of becoming them. Well...the kid who did so poorly in our classes he had to go back through the program again the next year (after the rest of us graduated) before getting his degree is the one that did it. And it was a long road for him through years of Special Ed and Masters degreeS etc. But he kept the goal in mind and made it reality.
And that's the key. Keep the goal in mind and it will become reality. Lose sight of the goal and it'll never happen.

1 Comments:

Anonymous Pieter said...

Dear Jamey,

I am metaphorically crying/laughing. This is one of the clearest and most concise "statements of self" I have read in a very long time.

I do not know everything, but I do have a very strong feel for where you have been, where you are, and where you want to be. The last I refer to as "the white house on the hill"; a reference to the abode I dwelled in from 7th to 12th forms.

Before I continue, I wish to respond to your statement that "...home repair/renovation is not Art" I disagree. In so far as the repair is done with due diligence and an eye to not only fix the fault, but to make the space aesthetically more pleasing than it was before you touched it, it is Art. If all you do is a "wham, bam, thank you for the check", yes, you are correct.

I will not begin a written discussion about what is Art, is it the material used etc, I went through that justifying Photo (B&W)for so long; it is what I am good at, not Great like you. But I do so look forward to a Sunday afternoon on the back-porch of a beautiful restored house where we can try to charm each other to change each other's minds about what is ART?.

I had the same conversation with my Father - different topic, same desire.

As usual, a short hello, "thanks for the read", as expanded. I need an Editor. I will leave with a quesiton and a comment.

Do you Raku?

I too had a friend who staryed from what was clearly his calling. He went Art School et all, and graduated and started, but the "reality" set in; monetary and some family. He went from this to that, but never stopped painting. Now he is back at it.

I will see you back at xpnonline. I also viewed Roz's space(have I erred again), it was a very nice place to visit, so please say hello for me.

Pieter - Jaap

1/28/2006 12:00 PM  

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